How to Write a Resume that Works for Ex-Offenders

2019-09-05T05:11:47+00:00August 18, 2014|

Each person deserves a second chance. But as an ex-offender, how can you prove that you have changed when you’re not given the chance to renew yourself and correct your mistakes? How will you look for a job, start over again, and embark on another chapter in your life? Well, it may be hard for you to enter the corporate world when you can’t craft the “best” resume for felons that will compel hiring managers of your worth as a professional. Here are a few tips to heed.

Creating a Resume for Felons

Though a few managers are wary of hiring ex-felons, you’ll still find a means to pass through this phase. Having proper resume layout and format, you’ll realize your job search turning around and gaining the best results. So how will you write your piece to re-launch your career? Take these tips.

1. Use the functional format.

Don’t use the chronological style or your job search will suffer. This does not mean you must hide the truth on your stay in prison. Your goal in writing a summary is to win an interview. Thus, you don’t need to list each offense here. What you must do is write the skills you acquired before or during jail time. These skills can serve as your keywords to boost your chances for the job.

2. Focus on the job you want.

Cite each skill that you can offer. Make your piece employer-centered so they will notice your file. To do this, put a career tag right beneath your contact details to inform the hiring manager of the post you intend to fill. Also, allot a section for your qualifications profile, which contains strong phrases that describe you as a professional.

3. Watch your words.

Take this to heart. Choose the terms you’re going to use. For example, if you underwent training at “Maine State Prison,” you must not write it as such. Instead, write “State of Maine.” This is not a lie, nor deceit. This is true. Placing the word “prison” may cause you to lose your chance of being hired. They may pre-judge you for using the word.

Where to Say It

The job interview is the best time to speak of your conviction. Thus, don’t be afraid to tell your story. Do it with honesty. Further, doing so will keep you from future troubles once you get hired.

Pieces of Advice

It’s better if you apply with firms that hire ex-felons so you won’t experience any fear of rejection.

The best format of resume for felons or ex-felons is the functional style. It highlights your skills and potentials but doesn’t conceal your prison term.

Now, if you’re ready to take the challenge of relaunching your career, look for an ex-offender resume example online to guide you through the writing process. If you find it hard to craft your own summary, seek help from the experts at Resume Professional Writers. Contact 1 (800) 845-0586 to inquire of the company’s services.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay