We’re so used to reading articles like, “How to answer tough interview questions” where we are taught to give answers we think hiring managers want to hear. If you’ve been looking for a job for a while now, you’re also familiar with the usual set of queries.

Whether you realize it or not, there’s a handful of stupid job interview questions that are way too hard to find answers; we are going to answer them right now, but in a very untraditional way.

“Why should we hire you?”

That’s a good question. But unfortunately it’s one I won’t be able to answer. You’re about to meet or have met other applicants, and maybe you’ve already found the person perfect for the job. What I can say is this, if we’re meant to do great things together, we’ll both be aware of it.

“What’s your greatest accomplishment?”

I consider the fact that I am surviving and advancing in this industry my biggest professional accomplishment. But as a person, providing for my family and raising my kids to be great people are the things I’m proud of the most.

“What’s your greatest weakness?”

There was a time when the thought of my weakness consumed me; it terrified me and I constantly tried to be good at that area. But over time I realized that I shouldn’t fret over my weaknesses and focus on my strengths instead; I constantly push myself to be better at things I’m already good at.

“Where do you see yourself in five years?”

If I’m blessed enough to still be alive and healthy by then I’ll continue to work hard on the things I’m passionate about and enjoy.

“What makes you a top performer?”

What made me a top performer in my previous company may not be beneficial here. But if you can share some details about what this job demands I can tell you stories of how I dealt with situations like that before.

“What will you add to our team?”

In your opinion, what’s missing from your team? We’ll go from there.

“What’s the lowest salary you would accept?”

Are you offering me the job? If that’s the case I’ll be happy to proceed to salary negotiations.

Remember to have clear mind when you’re in a job interview; don’t lose track of the conversation and always keep your cool.

If you’re looking for a job, view our vast collection of resume templates to have an idea of what a fool-proof resume looks like.

Source: Larry Tyler @ LinkedIn, RAW IT