Resumes, like many other documents and tools, expire. Since technology is fast changing, you must re-assess and edit your application tool. Check out these outdated resume tips you should ignore at all cost.

Outdated Resume Tips You Must Ignore

1. “Include an objective statement.”

Does your current resume include an objective statement? Get rid of it. Your goal doesn’t matter; the goal of the hiring managers or recruiters does. And their goal is to assess your skills and find out if you are eligible for the vacant post.
Instead of writing your resume objective, use the space to sell your candidacy. In four to six sentences, explain what you’re best at and how you can give value to your prospective employer. Tell them your professional brand by putting a “Summary of Qualifications” section at the top of your resume.

2. “State that your references are available upon request.”

Ignore this outdated resume tip. Adding the phrase “References available upon request” is perhaps the most common offense applicants do. It’s a waste of space and a pointless addition. Employers know you will give references if they ask you to, no need to say it.

3. “Make your resume one-page long.”

The ideal length for a resume is two pages. It gives you enough space to be in-depth without burying the vital information. Some positions, such as in the medical and academic fields, require a longer resume. Just make sure you include only the relevant details such as publications, research, and other items that the position requires.

4. “Include all your technical skills, even the outdated ones.”

Pass up this outdated resume advice. Today’s employers don’t care if you’re a pro in typewriters or fax machines. If your resume includes any archaic pieces of equipment, remove them at once. Replace them with new computer systems and software. If you feel insecure about your skills, further your education so the technical skills you will list on your resume will be modern and up-to-date.

5. “Disguise your weaknesses as strengths.”

Are you fond of saying, “I’m a detail-oriented person and I find it hard to let go of my work?” Cut the crap. What your future employer wants to hear is a real flaw, like, “I’m a little disorganized in my workspace” or “I email too much instead of talking to my colleagues.”
Yet, never mention your biggest gaffes, like saying you love to gossip or you often miss deadlines. While it’s all right to admit that you have a weakness, be tactful when answering interview questions and highlighting a trivial one.

6. “Put a title at the top of your resume.”

Do not follow this outdated resume advice. It’s not advisable anymore to add a title at the top of your resume just so your recruiters would know what they would receive. Instead, use the filename to imply what you’re sending. We suggest a simple filename such as this: JohnKennedyResume.doc (FirstNameLastNameResume.doc.)

7. “Print your resume on special paper.”

A few years ago, job applicants would print their resumes on the finest quality of paper and mail it to their prospective employers. Now, we either email our resumes or post them on Internet job boards.

If you’re still printing your resume on special paper and mailing it, you’re wasting money and time. Unless hiring managers require mailing, you should always send your job application in an electronic format.
Whether you’re applying for the first time or changing careers, ignore these outdated resume tips at all cost. If you need further proofs that these tips are obsolete, check out our resume samples.

Sources: workitdaily.com|monster.com
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